Saab rewarded for equality

For the second year in succession, Saab has been rewarded in recognition of active and successful work with equality. The award was presented at a gala, arranged by the business magazine, Veckans Affärer, to recognise the best workplaces in Sweden and the 125 most powerful women in business.

”It’s obviously great to lead and work for a company that ranks among the top five in Sweden, and one that has several women on the 125-list, but I want to emphasise that ultimately it is my firm belief that greater equality increases profitability for the company,” says Lena Olving.

Image: Camilla Wagner, Head of Veckans Affärer Kvinna and Lena Olving, Vice President at Saab, at the ceremony to name Sweden’s best workplaces and the 125 most powerful women in Swedish industry. Saab was among the best workplaces in Sweden and Lena Olving climbed to second place on this year’s list of the 125 most powerful women in Swedish industry.

Camilla Wagner, Head of Veckans Affärer Kvinna and Lena Olving, Vice President at Saab, at the ceremony to name Sweden’s best workplaces and the 125 most powerful women in Swedish industry. Saab was among the best workplaces in Sweden and Lena Olving climbed to second place on this year’s list of the 125 most powerful women in Swedish industry.

The prize for Sweden’s best workplace was awarded to five Swedish companies and is the result of a survey based on questions within four areas:

  • The ratio between men and women at the company.
  • The comparison between men and women’s wages or other benefits.
  • Corporate culture – is there an explicit policy against certain things that excludes women?
  • Work-life balance – questions relating to the difference between men’s and women’s leave entitlements or part-time work.

Since 2007, Saab has been focused on gender equality, and today the company considers equality in everything from recruitment processes to succession planning.

Saab’s Group target is for 30 percent of wage-determining managers to be female by 2015. When the company set this target in 2007, the level was just over 15 percent. Today, Saab has just over 21 percent. The progress is monitored every month.

Veckans Affärer also compiles a list of the 125 most powerful women in Swedish business, including Lena Olving, Saab’s Vice President (2nd place), Gunilla Fransson, Head of the Security Defence Solutions business area (17th place) and Marie Bredberg, CEO of Combitech (42nd place).