Saab 90 Scandia

The Saab 90 Scandia was a twin-engine commercial aircraft intended for short and medium ranges up to 1,000 km.

Development of the Saab 90 Scandia started in 1944 during the second world war
to enable Saab to offer civil products after the war ended. The aircraft was
intended to replace the legendary DC-3, which was notably used by the Swedish
company ABA, which also provided ideas for the specification.

Scandia was a twin-engine commercial aircraft intended for short and medium ranges up to 1,000 km. On 16 November 1946, the first test flight was carried with extremely good results. The preliminary type certificate was issued as early as March 1947, enabling the aircraft to be demonstrated for potential customers in Europe, and later in Africa as well as North and South America.

In April 1948, ABA ordered ten aircraft with deliveries starting in 1950, but the first actual delivery was made in November 1949 to the Brazilian airline, VASP. In 1952, the Dutch company Fokker was commissioned to continue production as Saab's production capacity was needed for military production. In 1954, Fokker delivered six aircraft to ABA and VASP but then ceased production. Eventually, ABA sold their Scandias to VASP meaning that all 18 Scandias produced were now in Brazil. The final flight took place in Sao Paulo on 22 July 1969.

One example of the Scandia remains in Brazil at an air museum in the town of Bebeduro outside San Paolo.

 

Data and performance

Engine: 2 x P&W R-2180, 1,650 hp

Max. take-off weight: 16,000 kg

Maximum cruising speed: 390 km/h

Max. altitude: 7,500 m